Non-Duplication

  1.  

    We don’t know if another organization is programming at one of our proposed sites. How do we demonstrate we are not “duplicating efforts”?

    Visit Map2HealthyLiving (map2healthyliving.org) for a searchable online map of SNAP-Ed programming being offered in your proposed programming area. Follow the prompts: (1 What to Look For; 2) Where to Look; and 3) Go to search for other programs in your area by program type and location. After clicking "Go," the search will process, and the results will appear in the Results window on the right side of the page. All locations that meet the search criteria will be listed, along with the contact information. To identify SNAP-Ed programs at a given location: Once you have clicked “Enter Map,” you will find a menu bar at the top of the screen (Home; About; Feedback; Share; Print Map; and Map Styles). Click “Feedback” and follow the prompts to type your message. This information goes directly to MFF staff, who will respond promptly to your request. An online training is also available on Map2HealthLiving.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    If we are working in the same site as another program, but we are offering a different core intervention, is that considered duplication?

    Coordination of SNAP-Ed activities with other entities implementing publicly- or privately-funded health promotion or nutrition improvement strategies is necessary to reinforce and amplify each other’s efforts. In your community needs assessment, you should identify any other SNAP-Ed or other related programs and services that target low-income populations in your proposed program area, and discuss how you will coordinate to ensure complementary programming, effective use of resources, and non-duplication with these programs and services.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
 

Needs Assessment

  1.  

    We [have received funding in the past/did a needs assessment last year/are proposing the same programming, etc.]. May we utilize the same needs assessment in our FY20 proposal? If not, is performing a community needs assessment allowable with SNAP-Ed funding?

    Successful applicants demonstrate their relevancy and responsiveness to current community needs, trends, and interests. SNAP-Ed funding cannot be used to perform a formal community needs assessment. There are many existing community assessment resources that can be referenced or utilized (e.g., Community Commons.org, local hospital foundations or non-profit assessments, County Health Rankings, etc.).

    The tip sheet, A New Perspective on the Needs Assessment, which can be found on the How to Apply page, can provide additional information on developing needs assessments.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    If we have data from a previous program (not funded by SNAP-Ed), can we include this information in the RFP?

    Yes, previous results are expected to be used to evolve your programming. See Section G in the Proposal Instructions.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    Our community health needs assessment is in progress, should we submit preliminary data or old data as part of our proposal needs assessment?

    Use data that make the most sense to build your case for the population you want to serve, the settings in which you want to work, and the proposed programming. Only you will know what is the most relevant.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
 

General Grant

  1.  

    Where do I register for the Technical Assistance (TA) that is being offered?

    Registration information for the two TA Sessions is posted at: http://michigannutritionnetwork.com/how-to-apply/. TA sessions will be held on March 12th from 10:00-11:30 am and April 4th from 2:00-3:30 pm.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    How often does the Michigan Fitness Foundation release a competitive request for SNAP-Ed funding application?

    Generally, MFF has released competitive requests for SNAP-Ed funding proposals in late February. However, all SNAP-Ed funding through MFF relies on federal funding and cannot be guaranteed in the future.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    Does our company have to be 501(c)3/n status to apply for grant funding?

    To receive SNAP-Ed funding, applicants should be associated with an organization that has the capacity to participate in a reimbursement grant and comply with the intervention, evaluation, budget, and reporting requirements.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    What is the average grant award? Is there a minimum or maximum amount that organizations can apply for?

    Grant funding varies depending on what is proposed, and there is no minimum or maximum for which an organization may apply. Organizations should build out programming based on community needs using evidence-based interventions likely to have positive outcomes with your target population. The budget should align with the programming proposed and be reasonable and necessary.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    Is there possibility for funding at lower or higher amount than proposed?

    Successful proposals are typically funded with conditions, which allows for scaling back the program and budget, if needed.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    Is there a maximum number of grants that will be awarded?

    There is no maximum number of the SNAP-Ed grants awarded through MFF. The RFP process is competitive. The number of grants awarded depends on available funding and the number of quality proposals submitted.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    Who will be contacted about the funding decision for the proposed project?

    The Authorized Organization Representative listed in Section A of the proposal will receive notification about whether the proposed project was funded, funded with conditions, or not funded.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    Does submitting the proposal early result in any advantage or disadvantage? If we receive the award, can we begin immediately?

    All proposals are reviewed concurrently, so there is no advantage or disadvantage to submitting a proposal early. Programming for FY20 cannot begin until October 1, 2019 and is subject to MDHHS and USDA approval, and available funding.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    If we are applying for the first time, is it more advantageous to start small and prove our capacity first?

    It is best to propose programming that you can realistically accomplish based on your capacity.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    Is a Letter of Intent required?

    For the FY20 RFP, a Letter of Intent is a required document. It must be submitted by March 26th, 2019 at 4:00 pm EST for an applicant to be eligible to submit a proposal.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    For the Letter of Intent, is the total response for all 4 questions supposed to be less than 500 words, or is it 500 words per each of the 4 questions?

    The word limit for the narrative portion (all 4 questions) of the Letter of Intent is 500 words.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    Is there an overall page limit?

    There is no page limit; however, we encourage applicants to be thoughtful and intentional about what and how much information is needed to clearly describe your programming.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  13.  

    Can we add additional tables of our own design, for example, in the Needs Assessment section?

    If a section of the proposal calls for a narrative, do not replace all the narrative with a table; but if information can be presented more clearly and concisely in table format within the narrative, you may do so.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  14.  

    [On the Partner Information Sheet], would the evaluation representative be the program director or should it be the external evaluator?

    The evaluation representative should be the person at your organization who will be responsible for the overall coordination and oversight of the program evaluation, including collaborating with an external evaluator, if applicable.  Do not list an external evaluator.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  15.  

    What is the current and pending form and what information is required?

    The Current and Pending form is a required document, commonly solicited in most federal funding. Information on what is needed to complete the form is in the instructions on Page 1 of the Current and Pending Form document, which can be found on the How to Apply page. A Current and Pending Form should be completed for each key staff who will be funded by your FY20 SNAP-Ed program. At a minimum, this should include the Lead Program Contact, Financial Representative, and Evaluation Representative (if different from the Lead Program Contact).

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  16.  

    If we have a position that will be vacant when the grant is submitted, do we include them on the Current and Pending Form?

    Each key SNAP-Ed staff should have a Current and Pending. If there is a vacancy upon proposal submission and you know how the position will be funded, you should complete a Current and Pending Form for that position but list the staff member as “to be determined.”

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  17.  

    Are Letters of Support for SNAP-ED funding required for the FY20 RFP?

    At least two Letters of Collaboration are required. See Section K in the Proposal Instructions.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  18.  

    Can you define what is meant by “community wrap-around”?

    In the context of SNAP-Ed, community wrap-around refers to a comprehensive approach to programming that is coordinated, includes multiple components, and reaches the target population(s) on multiple levels of the Social-Ecological Model (SEM). At a minimum, this includes direct education and PSE efforts that work in tandem and are mutually-reinforcing.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  19.  

    For the Current and Pending Form, do you still include the finance lead if no SNAP-Ed dollars are going toward that person’s time?

    There should be a Current and Pending form for each key staff person (at the least, Program Lead, Finance Lead, and Evaluation Lead), but if no SNAP-Ed funding is being used for a particular position, you should either still include a Current and Pending Form for them or include a note that a particular position is not being funded through SNAP-Ed dollars.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  20.  

    In the Letter of Intent (LOI), is the fourth item (Anticipated Impact) where should put our objectives?

    Do not include SMART objectives in the LOI. The LOI is an opportunity for you to describe your anticipated program, who you will serve and where, and potential impacts.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  21.  

    Will the presentation [given during the TA session] be posted?

    The presentation will not be posted, but information about new content to pay attention to can be found in the Proposal Instructions and Budget Instructions posted on the MNN website.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  22.  

    Our Director of Finance is leaving; can we put our Superintendent down [in Section A of the proposal] as our Finance Lead while this position is being filled?

    You can put whomever makes sense for your organization.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  23.  

    Where are the two tip sheets [Needs Assessment and Selecting an Evidence-based Intervention] located?

    Both tip sheets are posted under the ‘Other Resources’ section of the How to Apply page on the MNN website.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  24.  

    What constitutes a domain?

    There are 6 Domains in SNAP-Ed: Eat, Live, Learn, Play, Work, and Shop. More information about Domains is included on page 11 of the FY 2020 RFP Backgrounder, as well as in Question 1 of the Program Delivery Sites/Settings Section below.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  25.  

    What does it mean to have overlapping funding streams?

    This applies when SNAP-Ed funds you to do work that you are already funded to do by another funding source, or, when there are other resources or funding structures in place (that could be accessed) to support that specific kind of work.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  26.  

    Do we include Indirect Channels and/or Indirect Contacts in Section B. Program Snapshot?

    Please do not include indirect channel reach in Section B - Program Snapshot. Reporting on indirect channel reach should be saved for Appendix B.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
 

Program Delivery Sites/Settings

  1.  

    What is a domain?

    SNAP-Ed categorizes settings where SNAP-Ed services may take place into six domains – Eat, Live, Learn, Work, Play and Shop. Examples of specific settings that fall into these domains can be found on page 11 in the Proposal Backgrounder.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    When identifying delivery sites, is it where the program will take place or also where we plan to recruit from?

    See page 18 in the Proposal Instructions for an explanation of delivery sites.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    Are there any restrictions on location?

    You are not required to concentrate your SNAP-Ed programming into one area. However, you must ensure that you are serving an eligible population(s) and that your needs assessment is driving your decisions for programming at selected locations and with selected audiences.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    How do we determine whether a store is an eligible site for SNAP-Ed programming? Where do we obtain information on a store’s SNAP redemptions?

    See page 18 in the Proposal Instructions for descriptions of site eligibility categories. For information on SNAP-Ed redemptions, please contact the store directly.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    For SNAP-Ed at worksites, how do we determine eligibility of workplaces?

    SNAP-Ed programming is allowable for a worksite if more than half of the workers earn annual wages comparable to 185% of the FPL for the state.

    One method to determine eligible worksites is to use data from the American Community Survey and Bureau of Labor Statistics to determine an hourly wage that would equate to no more than 185% FPL for an average SNAP household with at least one member who earns income.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    If we have a school that has been part of our program for multiple years and they drop below 50% free/reduced meals, can we still include them?

    No. If a school’s free/reduced meal rate is under 50% when you start your SNAP-Ed programming, the school is not eligible to receive SNAP-Ed programming.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    Should we check with individual school sites for updates on free and reduced school meal rates?

    For RFP writing, include what is posted on the MDE site with an understanding that all sites will have more details on qualifications by the time programming begins. Organizations that are funded will need to check free and reduced school meal rates to assure eligibility before starting programming at those sites.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    Can free or reduced school meal rates be shared among the district?

    School eligibility is determined at the building level; a district average cannot be used to qualify an individual school. However, if a school district has community eligibility, where all students are eligible to receive free school meals, then the entire school district is eligible for SNAP-Ed programming.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    Can SNAP-Ed be offered at summer camp programs, after-school programming, or summer meal sites?

    Yes, SNAP-Ed may be offered at summer camp programs, in before- or after-school programming, and at summer meal sites, if the participants are SNAP-eligible. Note that supporting all day summer camps with SNAP-Ed programming will not likely meet the reasonable and necessary criteria. Please see page 18 of the Proposal Instructions for site eligibility categories.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    [In the Proposal Form], for Section E, Question 5, what if there is programming in our area that is not listed on the Map to Healthy Living?

    The Map to Healthy Living is just one resource to identify local programming. If you are aware of other programming in your area related to nutrition, food access, physical activity, active living, etc., please list and describe them in your needs assessment.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    We have a private school interested in SNAP-Ed programming but does not have a lunch program; however, the school does fall in an eligible census tract. Can we include them in our programming?

    If a venue is located in a qualified census tract, it may qualify for SNAP-Ed programming. But just because a venue is in an eligible census tract does not always mean it is a place where SNAP-Ed eligible people go. For example, in a private school where students may come from different areas, a strong case must be made for SNAP-Ed eligibility. If a school does not have a free and reduced-price meal program, speaking with school administrators about its student demographics is recommended.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    One of our potential program sites is a hospital cafeteria. How might we qualify this site?

    When qualifying a site, it is important to make sure that the people who will be potentially impacted by your SNAP-Ed work are an eligible audience (i.e., low-income, with gross income at or below 185 percent of poverty). If targeting a hospital cafeteria in particular, be sure to consider its customer base (e.g., visitors, patients, and staff) and ensure that at least 50 percent of those served meet the above qualifications.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
 

Multi-Sector, Collaborative Approach

  1.  

    Is there a template available for the required Letters of Collaboration?

    There is no template, but the details of what must be included in the Letters of Collaboration (LOCs) are in Section K of the Proposal Instructions.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    Please explain the difference between ST7 and ST8 and provide an example of each.

    ST7 has an organization level focus; for example, partnerships within the school setting to implement PSE work in those schools. ST8 is multi-sector partnership and planning which means working with partners from at least five different sectors (e.g., healthcare, education, food industry) to advance SNAP-Ed goals and strategies. See pages 97 & 145 in the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework (Framework).

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    In the eligibility section [of the proposal] it states to partner with two Non-SNAP-Ed organizations. If there are more than two partner organizations can an additional partner be SNAP-Ed funded?

    That eligibility requirement correlates to Section K in the Proposal Instructions: Collaboration, the idea is that we encourage SNAP-Ed funded organizations to partner with more than just other SNAP-Ed funded organizations because the idea is to do community wrap-around programing that includes PSE change work. You may have some SNAP-Ed funded partners, that is okay, but you would not list them in the proposal under section M.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    If we are working with collaborative partners on community collaborative teams, how would we identify a domain?

    The domain would be determined by the topic or project on which the collaborative team is focusing.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
 

Allowability

  1.  

    Can you provide examples of allowable physical activity promotion?

    An example could be one-time demonstrations to introduce your audience to a variety of low/no-cost ways to get moving and then provide information on where they can access physical activity resources on an ongoing basis in their communities. See pages 37-38 of the Proposal Backgrounder for more information.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    If we are going to show participants how to make a recipe, can the grant funding pay for the cost for the food items purchased?

    Yes, SNAP-Ed funding can be used to pay for materials and supplies that are reasonable and necessary to deliver a program lesson with fidelity, including foods for experiential learning (e.g., food tastings or cooking demonstrations).

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    We would like to offer each participating site a stipend to put toward PSE change. Is there a list of approved purchases that a site could make using SNAP-Ed funding?

    Stipends or other incentives are unallowable. SNAP-Ed can cover the cost associated with a grantee’s time and effort to be part of (but not lead) a collaborative effort to determine site-based PSE changes; however, costs related to implementing those changes, must be covered by a source other than SNAP-Ed (e.g., a worksite providing funding to buy exercise equipment).

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    Can we provide our SNAP-Ed participants vouchers to purchase fruits and vegetables in local produce markets at the end of each nutrition education class they attend?

    SNAP-Ed cannot pay for payments, incentives, or prizes for recipients to attend nutrition education activities.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
 

Budget

  1.  

    Is there a benefit to an agency budgeting administrative costs as match or in-kind to this project?

    There is no required match as part of your budget. However, if an organization is funded and provides in-kind/match funding, this is detailed in a final report. If you have in-kind/match funding, think about how to track it for final report purposes. Including collaborations or partnerships that provide in-kind funding in Section K can help tell your story of leveraging resources and building sustainability.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    The Proposal Backgrounder mentions limited funding resources for SNAP-Ed in FY20. Can you provide more information about how this might affect our proposed budget?

    SNAP-Ed funding in Michigan is decreasing and given the competitive nature of the proposal, it is possible that your project will be funded at a lesser amount than you requested. Be thoughtful about the most effective use of funds when making programming decisions.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    In the Budget Worksheet in the Grant Staffing, Program Expenses, Travel, and Administrative/Space/Miscellaneous tabs, what does it mean when it asks for percentage for PSE?

    New in FY20, organizations must indicate the estimated allocation of certain costs to policy, systems, and environmental change (PSE) work. For instance, in Grant Staffing, for each salaried or contracted staff, report how much of their time will be spent on SNAP-Ed administration, direct education, and PSE. Use the table on pages 4-5 in the Budget Instructions for a description of what is included in each type of work. Similarly, for Program Expenses, Travel, and Administrative/Space/Miscellaneous, for each line item, indicate how much of the expense will be associated with your program’s PSE change-related work.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    Is it appropriate to budget for the purchase of curriculum/materials to have the most up-to-date versions?

    Yes, it is appropriate to budget for updating the materials, especially if the materials currently used have the old food guidance system (MyPyramid) or reference to the old Dietary Guidelines for Americans. All SNAP-Ed programs funded through MFF should be using materials that highlight MyPlate rather than older food guidance systems.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    Do we have to buy enough copies of curriculum or may we get the copy masters and copy pages for our students, teachers, and parents? If we may copy from a master, may we pay for contracted printing?

    We recommend that you assess what is reasonable and necessary for your program. Also consider the quality of copied/printed materials and curriculum costs. Contracted printing services are SNAP-Ed allowable expenses, and should be justified in your proposal.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    What should we budget if we are planning to use the PE-Nut Compendium resources for FY20?

    We recommend that you estimate the number of each survey you will need, plus shipping to/from, to determine the cost you should include in your budget. Spanish language surveys are available at no additional cost for That’s Me and the PE-Nut Parent Survey.

    • PE-Nut Parent Survey, 30 surveys per set - $8
    • That’s Me, 30 surveys per set - $8
    • Physical Activity Screener for Youth (Pre- and Post-Survey), 25 surveys per set - $8
    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    What is the cost of the Statewide Fruit and Vegetable and Physical Activity Screeners?

    Using guidance in the evaluation assurances, we recommend that you estimate the number of surveys you will need, plus shipping to/from, to determine the cost you should include in your budget. The cost of the Statewide Fruit and Vegetable and Physical Activity Screeners are as follows:

    • Fruit and Vegetable Screener for Adults (Pre- and Post-Survey), 30 surveys per set - $8
    • Fruit and Vegetable Screener for Youth (Pre- and Post-Survey), 30 surveys per set - $11
    • Physical Activity Screener for Adults (Pre- and Post-Survey), 25 surveys per set - $8
    • Physical Activity Screener for Youth (Pre- and Post-Survey), 25 surveys per set - $8
    • Food Questionnaire for Adults (Pre- and Post-Survey), 30 surveys per set - $0 (as this is still in the pilot stage)
    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    In the budget, what if a person's salary or other areas of the budget shift before the grant period begins?

    Changes often occur between proposal submission and the start of the grant. If funded, budget and program adjustments can be made prior to issuing a contract. If further adjustments are needed, a budget amendment can be made during the program year.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    Are payments to school team liaisons permitted? Each school has a team lead that organizes things at the school.

    Contracting with someone on a fee-for-service basis is allowable. You would need to provide a list of responsibilities and deliverables for that person, and those need to be completed to receive payment. Expenses must be reasonable and necessary in regard to programming and the budget.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    When traveling for SNAP-Ed, can we be reimbursed for rental vehicles or agency-owned vehicles in lieu of mileage?

    Yes. You should go with standard practice within your agency as long as it is not more expensive than charging the SNAP-Ed mileage rate.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    How and what should I budget for travel expenses related to the SNAP-Ed trainings that are offered by MFF?

    For 1-day trainings, applicants should budget for mileage needed to/from the training. For multi-day trainings, applicants should budget for mileage to/from the training and meals needed while in travel status (see travel guidelines in Proposal Backgrounder for details). MFF will cover lodging near the training site for MFF-sponsored, multi-day trainings. If you are traveling a long distance to a training/event, please consider additional travel costs when planning your budget. Current MNN events can be found at: http://michigannutritionnetwork.org/trainings. We anticipate a similar offering of events for FY20.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    We read that we must budget for the SNAP-Ed conference in August. Should we count all projected staff involved or just the program leads?

    SNAP-Ed University is the annual programming and operations training and will be held in East Lansing in August. All SNAP-Ed funded Partners are required to send two program leads to this event. MFF will cover the conference expenses, but the funded Partner should budget for mileage and meals needed while in travel status. See the Proposal Backgrounder for more information on SNAP-Ed University and travel guidelines.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  13.  

    Should we include funding for staff to obtain their ServSafe certification?

    ServSafe training is provided at no cost to all SNAP-Ed funded Partners. However, travel expenses associated with attending a ServSafe training are not covered and should be included in your budget. See the Proposal Backgrounder for more information on travel guidelines.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  14.  

    Should we submit the letter of approval for our federally-approved indirect rate with our proposal?

    Yes, this is a required piece of documentation that must be included with your proposal.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  15.  

    What should I do if my agency’s indirect cost rate certification expires during the window of time when the RFP is due?

    The expired rate can be used in your application. Submit with your application your expired indirect cost rate certification and a memo explaining your process for obtaining a new certification. Both documents will be required if you wish to include an indirect cost rate.

    Upon approval of your new rate, provide the rate documentation to MFF as soon as possible.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  16.  

    Our organization has not requested an indirect cost rate in the past. We are considering applying the de minimus rate of 10% this year. Would this change from our past applications negatively affect our competitiveness for funding?

    If you do not have a federally-approved indirect rate, and have never used one, you may enter a 10% de minimis indirect cost rate. All administrative expenses will be evaluated within the context of the proposed programming and must be reasonable, necessary, and properly documented and allocated.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  17.  

    My agency has high administrative costs. How will administrative cost be evaluated?

    Given the limited funds available and the competitive nature of SNAP-Ed funding, administrative costs will be evaluated carefully within the context of the full proposal and scope of programming. Proposals that can deliver effective programming with low administrative costs will receive priority for funding.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  18.  

    Can we direct allocate administrative expenses?

    Yes, as long those administrative costs do not overlap with costs included in an established indirect cost rate.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  19.  

    The Budget Worksheet calculates the indirect on the “Total Direct Expenditures” and our federal indirect rate is based on salary & fringe. How do you want us to enter our indirect amount?

    For indirect costs that are not calculated as a percent of total direct expenditures, include an indirect cost amount (in dollars) in the indirect cost amount row in the Budget Summary tab, along with a brief explanation of how that number was calculated.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  20.  

    If we would like to include costs that are listed as "if pre-approved by MFF in your proposal" in our budget, do we just include them in the budget or do we need to go through a pre-approval process prior to submitting the proposal?

    You should include all reasonable and necessary costs to implement your proposed programming in your Budget Worksheet, including expenses that require pre-approval from MFF. Upon review of your proposal, and, if recommended for funding, it will be determined what costs are justified given your program’s scope of work and SNAP-Ed allowability. Based on that feedback, MFF will request a final, updated budget before the contract execution and program initiation.

    During the program year, you should work closely with your MFF Project Manager to obtain pre-approvals on any expenses requiring prior authorization. If for some reason an expense does not get approved, those funds may be able to be reallocated.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  21.  

    If our chosen direct education intervention recommends accompanying materials such as visuals, weekly worksheets, handouts, and reinforcement items, can we list this in our budget? Take-home reinforcement items listed under the intervention include water bottles, grocery list pads, produce brushes, food thermometers, etc.

    Any supplemental or accompanying materials used to complement the core intervention must be SNAP-Ed allowable as well as reasonable and necessary. This holds true even if the material is listed as part of the curriculum or intervention (e.g., water bottles are not an allowable SNAP-Ed expense).

    Regarding reinforcement items in particular, MFF provides SNAP-Ed Partners with no-cost Nutrition Education Reinforcement Items (NERI) for use in their programs to promote and reinforce consistent, statewide SNAP-Ed messaging on fruit/vegetable consumption and physical activity. A list of current NERI may be found on the order form at https://michigannutritionnetwork.org/neri/.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  22.  

    If our financial person is included in our administrative cost, do we still need to complete a current/pending form for them? They are not funded by other grants.

    If the position is built into the administrative cost or indirect, they do not need a current and pending form.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  23.  

    Clarification for existing SNAP-Ed funded organizations – when talking about the percent of resources in the budget anticipated to be allocated to PSE work, does that refer to the anticipated FY 2020 funds or the funding for the FY 2019 PSE initiative?

    The anticipated budget for FY 2020 SNAP-Ed funding.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  24.  

    If we are going to have [someone] on the grant who works at a partner organization, should we list them under contracted staff on the budget form? They would be an employee of our partner organization (completely outside our organization).

    Before contracting with staff from outside organizations, it is important to consider if it is reasonable and necessary, as well as how your organization will oversee that work. If it makes sense to move forward, the individual (as described above) would not go under Contracted Staff but rather Program Supplies because it would be an independent, third-party contractor.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  25.  

    The application instructions state “funding requests less than $150,000 will receive evaluation support from MFF; those with funding requests greater than $150,000 are expected to budget for a third-party evaluator.” Should we avoid a budget of exactly $150,000?

    You should put together a budget that aligns with your proposed programing that is based on a strong needs assessment(s) of the community(ies) in which you will work and of the target audience(s) you will serve.

    Please note that the term “funding requests” is used in the budget instructions because it is part of the request for proposals. The expectation of working with a third-party evaluator will be based on the actual award amount.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  26.  

    When entering descriptive information into the cells (in multiple sheets), the text doesn't wrap. Is there a way to make the adjust the cells to allow for all of the wording to be seen?

    Unfortunately, it cannot be adjusted, as the spreadsheet is locked and has merged cells.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
 

Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) Change

  1.  

    What are the levels of the Social Ecological Model? Do we have to program at all levels of the Social Ecological Model?

    Refer to page 7 of the Proposal Backgrounder for the most up-to-date version of the Social Ecological Model (SEM) used in SNAP-Ed. While you do not have to program at all levels of the SEM, it is required that you select interventions that, at a minimum, operate at the individual and environmental settings levels.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    How granular do PSE objectives need to be?

    Refer to page 17 of the Proposal Backgrounder and Section L in the Proposal Instructions for information on the development of PSE objectives. For FY20, applicants are required to choose at least one short-term and one medium-term Environmental Settings level indicator from the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework (Framework), as well as demonstrate how a multi-sector, collaborative approach will be used.

    Additionally, for returning SNAP-Ed subrecipient organizations:

    • For those that have implemented SNAP-Ed programming for at least two (2) full program years,ST8:Multi-Sector Partnerships and Planning is required; and
    • For those that have implemented SNAP-Ed programming in any domain for at least three (3) full program years, at least one LT indicator per domain, such as LT5: Nutrition Supports Implementation and LT6: Physical Activity Supports Implementation, must be included.
    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    How do you determine PSE reach?

    Reach is defined as the number of unduplicated individuals who experience your intervention and are influenced by it. For example, if you are using Smarter Lunchrooms for a PSE intervention in a school setting, and all students utilize the lunchroom(s) you aim to influence, then you could reasonably estimate the reach to be the total student body.

    In the case of a combined DE and PSE intervention (e.g., Rec-Connect), both components should be taken into account when calculating reach.

    DE reach is determined by the number of people who participated in the DE. To calculate the PSE reach, think about what parameters could be used to determine the number of people who will be influenced by the PSE change and make a reasonable estimate. However, remember not to double count participants. The PSE reach should exclude those already accounted for in the DE reach. Add the final DE and PSE reach numbers to get the reach for the intervention.

    See the Proposal Instructions on Appendix A for more information.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    How do I estimate the reach for PSE programming occurring in eligible grocery stores?

    For a qualifying grocery store, you could use community data (e.g., census data) to report reach. If you have determined eligibility for a grocery store based on SNAP redemption rates, you could apply the percentage of SNAP sales to determine reach. Plan to work closely with the store(s) with which you are partnering.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    In SNAP-Ed, we have been prohibited from leading collaborative efforts [PSE work]. Is that still the case?

    SNAP-Ed providers should play a supportive but not leading role in PSE change efforts and partnerships. When thinking about how to define a lead vs. supporting role, consider whether your role is helping to facilitate partnerships/collaborations with those who can create PSE change, and if implementation and maintenance of these initiatives would continue without SNAP-Ed funds.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    Can we serve on state-level coalitions advancing nutrition and/or physical activity PSE changes?

    Serving on coalitions must directly relate to the local on-the-ground work you are doing. Successful applicants are funded to do programming at the local or regional level, thus, the time and effort to serve on coalitions should be focused on local or regional level.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    If we are working together to change PSE, do our partners become part of what we evaluate, in terms of their programming?

    ST7 and ST8 in the Framework provide specific measures for partnerships and multi-sector partnerships and planning.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    For PSE interventions, is it allowable to purchase signage to promote fruit/vegetable consumption or physical activity at a point of decision?

    It may be allowable to provide point-of-decision making signage and other cues to action that promote fruit/vegetable consumption or physical activity, depending on how they are tied to your evidence-based SNAP-Ed programming and cost. You would want to consider what is reasonable and necessary. See the Proposal Backgrounder for further information.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    Clarification for existing SNAP-Ed funded organizations - if we want to incorporate the FY 2019 PSE Initiative into our FY 2020 proposal, can we use the same deliverables and implement them in 2 other communities?

    The intent of the FY 2019 PSE Initiative is to put building blocks in place so that you have recommendations and clear next steps to operationalize and move PSE strategies and implementation forward in the communities in which you are working for the PSE Initiative. If you want to follow the same or similar process with additional communities for your FY 2020 SNAP-Ed work, that could be fine as long as you are continuing on with the next steps (i.e., delivering SNAP-Ed strategies) in the initial communities where you laid the groundwork as part of the PSE initiative in FY 2019. Do not only do a repeat of the PSE Initiative process and deliverables in new communities for FY 2020.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    Clarification for existing SNAP-Ed funded organizations - how will we know what the outcome is for the FY 2019 PSE initiative and be able to include it in FY 2020 proposal if we have not started it?

    What you learn through the PSE Initiative will set you up to operationalize and implement PSE strategies in specific communities for the second half of FY 2020. We recognize that you won’t know what those specific strategies are at this point. However, it is required that you include PSE interventions that align with the short- (e.g., ST7) and medium-term (e.g., MT5) indicators at the environmental level as well as the short-term indicator (ST8) at the Sectors of Influence level in the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework. It is recommended that in FY 2020 you include staff time and effort to carry out the community-specific recommendations/next steps from the PSE initiative to keep that work moving forward. You could also implement the PSE Initiative process in new communities.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    [Our coalition has several (PSE) project ideas]. Are we required to have an evidence-based curriculum to support our PSE intervention?

    PSE change efforts should be based on approaches and strategies rooted in evidence. This may include using an assessment tool (e.g., HSAT, NAP SACC), a packaged intervention (e.g., Stock Healthy, Shop Healthy, Rec-Connect), or other strategies that are supported by evidence of effectiveness.

    If you are working with a coalition that is planning on implementing a PSE change project, it would be recommended to conduct an assessment, if one has not been completed already, to identify what kind of PSE change is needed in the community and then select an appropriate evidence-based approach to address that need.

    It is also important to recognize that while there are strategies and interventions to help guide you, PSE change work is a process. All the steps that go into reaching a PSE change, such as the relationship building, community engagement, assessments, and feedback loops, are as key to the project as the resulting change.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    How do we measure reach for a Rec-Connect community?

    Think about the number of people who will be impacted by the PSE changes resulting from Rec-Connect (or corner store work for Question 13). This may be the whole community or just a portion. Use your best estimate and ensure you have solid reasoning/justification for the reach number provided.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  13.  

    We are proposing to work with corner stores. How should we go about determining PSE reach numbers at these sites, beyond census data for that city, as that number is much larger than what the actual reach may be?

    Please see response under Question 12 above.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  14.  

    How does Safe Routes to School align with PSE programming? Would this be considered a supplemental intervention that can be written into PSE programming?

    With any PSE change effort, the role of SNAP-Ed is to consult, educate, and bring people together. Opportunities to work with a Safe Routes to School effort may be appropriate for SNAP-Ed staff to play a supporting, not lead, role; however, keep in mind that there are also dedicated resources to do Safe Routes to School (which are provided through MFF and MDOT). There wouldn’t be any costs associated with the work except some time and effort.

    Through partnerships or coalitions, Safe Routes to School work may come out of that relationship building; however, it would not be a supplemental nor a PSE intervention. Rather, it is considered a set of strategies. Please see Question 8 under Interventions for more information on Safe Routes to School.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  15.  

    [In our PE-Nut program] we count the entire school population as DE reach since all students receive EPEC. How would we go about determining reach numbers for Smarter Lunchrooms PSE work [in the same schools]? Can you count reach for both of those populations if it’s the same group of kids?

    Since PE-Nut and Smarter Lunchrooms are two separate interventions within the school, you may report reach as the school population for each intervention.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
 

Evaluation

  1.  

    How should we plan to execute our program evaluation for FY20?

    For grantees funded for less than $150,000, MFF will assist with your evaluation.

    For grantees funded for greater than $150,000, you may contract with an external evaluator, or complete your evaluation in-house, depending on your capacity. MFF Project Managers and Evaluation Specialists will approve and/or recommend changes to your evaluation design, plan, and evaluation budget accordingly.

    NOTE: The network-wide evaluation strategy for SNAP-Ed funded subrecipients may be adjusted based on the outcomes of the FY 2019 evaluation, as determined by MFF.

    All applicants should consider the following evaluation-related expenses when writing your budget:

    • Time and effort for evaluation tasks (e.g., data collection, monthly reporting of process evaluation, etc.)
    • Necessary supplies (e.g., printing, survey costs, etc.)
    • Postage (e.g., return shipping of evaluation tools to MFF, postage to mail surveys to participants)
    • Travel (e.g., mileage for on-site data collection)
    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    Do we need to list all our objectives in Section L (Indicators and SMART Objectives)?

    All your primary SMART objectives must be listed in Section L. There is not a limit on the number of SMART objectives. However, we recommend that you combine objectives where there is alignment with target audience, outcome, and/or type of intervention. Make sure you follow the Proposal Instructions. You should have at least one SMART objective for each indicator that you select.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    May we keep the same objectives as the previous year if we are programming to the same audience but at new sites?

    Objectives should be reassessed each year and based on outcomes of previous program evaluation results, your needs assessment, and the indicators and outcome measures selected.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    Is it possible that our SMART objectives for direct education interventions can include elements of PSE SMART objectives?

    SMART objectives need to directly relate to the indicators and outcome measures you are addressing and the interventions being proposed; therefore, SMART objectives for direct education interventions should be separate from SMART objectives for PSE work.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    Is it necessary to have a SMART objective related to physical activity?

    It is not required to have a SMART objective related to physical activity; however, if a substantial portion of your programming includes physical activity promotion, consider including a SMART objective for physical activity to justify the SNAP-Ed funds being expended.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    If we reach participants in multiple age groups, should we create a SMART objective for each one?

    If it makes sense with your programming and evaluation, you can combine age groups.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    Do I need to commit to a specific environmental assessment tool when I submit the proposal?

    See the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework for possible assessment tools. Remember to list assessments in the education materials used in Section F.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    Is there an evaluation tool approved for young children?

    MFF endorses the Statewide Screeners, which begin at age 12 for fruit and vegetable consumption and age 9 for physical activity; That’s Me, My Choices, which can be used in grades 3 and up; and the PE-Nut Parent Survey, which may be appropriate to collect information related to younger children’s dietary intake. However, existing, reliable, and validated tools specific to your curricula/programming may also be considered, if appropriate.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    Can we create our own evaluation tool(s)?

    Tool development is not allowable for outcome evaluation. Program specific process evaluation tools to support your programming may be permitted. If your proposal is funded, you will have the opportunity to work with your MFF SNAP-Ed Project Manager on identifying specific tools to help with your evaluation.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    If evaluation tools are not readily available for a certain intervention, does that mean MFF would assist with the evaluation for this program [intervention]?

    If evaluation tools are not readily available, you need to do some legwork to ensure that any proposed evaluation tools or strategies align with the intervention chosen. For example, using statewide screeners (e.g. the Fruit and Vegetable Screeners or Physical Activity Screeners) would not align with an intervention that impacts PSE change and not individual behavior change. Use the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework to help you identify a possible evaluation tool or strategies that align with the intervention and what you are trying to measure, including outcome measures and metrics related to anticipated individual behavior change or PSE change. If you are funded at less than $150,000, MFF will provide evaluation assistance.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    Where can I find general MFF process evaluation tools, like a highlight sheet that coordinators can fill out after a lesson?

    For proposal writing, you do not need to name a specific tool, but rather describe the type of tool you will use. Some curricula offer specific evaluation materials that may be utilized. At this point, MFF-specific tools, are not publicly available. If funded, MFF would work with your organization to identify and finalize which evaluation tools would be most effective and appropriate for your program.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    If an existing SNAP-Ed program works with an external evaluator, are we required to go through a bid selection process for FY 2020?

    If working with an external evaluator, you should have the justification for who you are working with and how they were selected documented and on file.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  13.  

    If a SNAP-Ed program has delivered programming in any domain for at least three (3) full program years, at least one Long Term (LT) indicator per domain must be included. How many additional SMART objectives do we need to include? Do we need a separate SMART objective for each domain?

    You would need to have a SMART objective including an LT indicator for each domain that you have been working in for at least 3 program years, but the way that you write your SMART objectives will be specific to the work that you are doing. You do not necessarily need a different SMART objective for each LT indicator for each domain. They could all combine if it is similar work. Look at the SNAP-Ed Evaluation Framework for more information on LT indicators.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  14.  

    In Section M of the proposal (Process Evaluation), training is mentioned; is that training that we provide or is it training that MFF will provide?

    Training you plan for with your SNAP-Ed staff within your organization.

    Last updated: March 15, 2019 Back to Top
  15.  

    How can LT1: Healthy Eating be measured for the PE-Nut program? Is there a specific survey and audience you would recommend for measuring this?

    Individual-level long-term (LT) indicators and outcome measures assess the degree to which individual health behavior changes that were made in the medium-term (MT1-MT4) have been sustained at (a minimum of) 6 months post intervention. This would be measured using a similar evaluation tool that was used to measure MT1-MT4.

    Nonetheless, please note that individual-level LT indicators require follow-up tracking of prior SNAP-Ed participants. This may be outside the scope of local MFF SNAP-Ed programs and would required MFF approval.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  16.  

    Our SNAP-Ed program works in the Learn and Shop domains, and we might start work in Play. Do we need a long-term indicator PER [EACH OF THE 5] DOMAINS, including Live and Eat?

    The requirement for returning organizations is that there must be at least one long-term (LT) indicator for each domain in which you have programmed for at least 3 years. In the case described above, if you have been working in the Learn and Shop domains for at least 3 program years, you need to have at least one LT indicator for each of those domains. For Play, if this is a new domain for your program, no LT indicator is needed. Similarly, if you have not worked in Live or Eat, you would not include an LT indicator for those either.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  17.  

    For our newly required LT evaluation indicator - we chose LT5. Do we need to include all three outcome measures for this indicator? For example - LT5a, b and c? Or can we pick and choose based on what is the best fit for our program currently?

    The outcome measures you select will be based on the work you plan to do and the SMART objective(s) you develop to evaluate your program. LT5a and LT5b measure the implementation quality of a PSE change, and LT5c pertains to measuring effectiveness. Note that LT5a and LT5b are intertwined and would likely be paired together. For more information on LT indicators at the environmental settings level, see the tip sheet, Understand and Assessing Long-Term Indicators, which may be found on the MNN website under the How to Apply page.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  18.  

    We are trying to figure out the best outcome [measures] for MT1 to align with our SMART objectives. Can a SMART objective around increased frequency [use MT1l and MT1m] even if there are no cup measurements included in the survey tool being used?

    Since MT1l and MT1m most closely align with the survey, you may list them as your outcome measures. Another option would be to define your outcome measure as “MT1 – Other” and note the outcome measure your survey will use (i.e., increased frequency of fruit and vegetable consumption). Either way would be acceptable.

    Last updated: April 11, 2019 Back to Top
  19.  

    If we include an LT1 outcome measure, should we budget for evaluation services related to it? Should we plan to use a tool created by MFF to measure LT1? Or, should we use That's Me: My Choices (we use PE-Nut) and survey students that have been a part of the program in previous years?

    If LT1 will be included as an indicator in your SNAP-Ed program, it needs to be evaluated appropriately.

    LT1 is a long-term outcome to measure sustained healthy eating behavior after graduating from direct education. It requires you to be able to follow and re-assess the same cohorts of past participants over time. The same tool should be used when possible, as you should be able to compare data over time.

    Keep in mind that tracking and evaluating long-term individual level indicators may or may not be appropriate for your SNAP-Ed program and could require MFF approval.

    Last updated: April 12, 2019 Back to Top
 

Interventions

  1.  

    What is meant by "intervention"?

    Interventions are a specific set of evidence-based, behaviorally-focused activities and/or actions to promote healthy eating and active lifestyles. They can be research-tested or practice-tested and generally have core elements and multiple components. They provide ways of intervening that are likely to have a public health impact. See page 22 of the Proposal Backgrounder more details.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  2.  

    In choosing an intervention, what should be considered?

    An intervention should be based on a thorough needs assessment; evidence base that the intervention will likely result in positive outcomes with the target audience; and your organizational capacity to implement the intervention.

    The tip sheet, A Closer Look at Evidence-Based Interventions, which can be found on the How to Apply page, can provide additional information on selecting appropriate interventions.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  3.  

    Do you have a list of all approved SNAP-Ed Curricula?

    See pages 7-8 of the Proposal Backgrounder or page 8 of the Proposal Instructions for more information on resources for potential curricula.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  4.  

    I identified an intervention I’m interested in using. How will I know if it is allowable to implement in Michigan with SNAP-Ed funding?

    Your proposal should make the case for how the intervention(s) you select aligns with your needs assessment and organizational capacity, as well as present evidence that demonstrates the likelihood that the intervention will produce positive outcomes with your target audience. See Question 2 in Interventions. Also, see pages 7-8 of the Proposal Backgrounder and page 7 of the Proposal Instructions for more information about using evidence-based interventions.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  5.  

    What if I find an evidence-based intervention that could work but needs changes to fit with my target population?

    It is important that interventions are used as intended, as the evidence base was established with the full intervention. Delivering part of an intervention would mean that there is no evidence the intervention will result in positive outcomes with your target audience.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  6.  

    I understand that we need to ensure fidelity and program consistency in delivering the chosen intervention, but inconsistency may result from site to site. If the programming is fundamentally the same, is this okay?

    All attempts should be made to deliver the program as intended. That said, issues may arise during implementation that could impact your plans for fidelity. Your process evaluation should measure the degree to which you were able to deliver programming consistently and as planned, and clearly identify unforeseen variables that influenced your program fidelity.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  7.  

    If we are programming at several elementary schools, can a school have a different intervention based on its unique situation (i.e., can interventions vary from site to site)?

    Your needs assessment should drive your decisions for programming. Results from your needs assessment should serve as the rationale for why the intervention(s) was selected, how it will meet the needs of the target audience, and how it will achieve your program objectives.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  8.  

    What elements of Safe Routes to School are SNAP-Ed eligible?

    The costs associated with implementing a Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program vary widely. There is no cost associated with a SRTS training, and SNAP-Ed funds may be used to cover costs for time and effort, printing or other promotional supports for a Safe Routes to School intervention. However, funds may not be used to cover infrastructure. Plan to work closely with your SNAP-Ed Project Manager to determine allowability.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  9.  

    Is it possible to use Michigan Harvest of the Month materials as an intervention for our proposed program?

    Michigan Harvest of the Month (MiHOTM) alone cannot be used as a core intervention. It could, however, be used to supplement your core nutrition intervention. The following link provides more information on how MiHOTM may be used in your programming: http://michigannutritionnetwork.org/mihotm/.

    Last updated: March 13, 2019 Back to Top
  10.  

    Can I check out a curriculum to review

    If MFF has a copy of a curriculum that you would like to review, you are welcome to do so at the MFF office.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  11.  

    Is there a limited budget allowed for curriculum and supply materials?

    There is a range in the cost of curricula, supplies, and materials depending on the intervention(s) selected. You should consider what is reasonable and necessary for your SNAP-Ed programming when budgeting for program supplies and materials.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  12.  

    Will NERI still be available at no cost to Partners?

    Yes, NERI will be available at no cost to MFF SNAP-Ed Partners.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  13.  

    What is the difference between a session and a series?

    A session is a single lesson or class, while a series is made up of multiple sessions. Session and series are also defined in the Proposal Instructions under Section I – Program Timeline.

    For example, if you have an intervention that consists of a total of six lessons, those six lessons (i.e., sessions) represent one complete series.

    Intervention ABC

    1 series of Intervention ABC is made up of 6 lessons/sessions.

    If you plan to implement the intervention a total of four times during the year, then the number of series you will implement is four.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  14.  

    Does every applicant have to do both direct education and PSE?

    Yes, proposals must include direct education (DE) and policy, systems, and environmental (PSE) change work. All DE and PSE efforts should be robust, mutually-reinforcing, and based on a thorough needs assessment.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  15.  

    Can we offer DE targeting Physical Activity (PA) among students or does it have to include nutrition education?

    Physical activity promotion should be provided within the context of direct nutrition education. See the Proposal Backgrounder for program parameters on physical activity promotion.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  16.  

    How in depth do we need to get when outlining the proposed education materials we will use with our intervention(s)?

    Focus on providing a list of education materials that relate to your core intervention(s). It is not necessary to list every book title or newsletter edition. See example on page 8 of the Proposal Instructions.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  17.  

    Do we need to provide the evidence base for all our supplemental materials?

    For supplemental materials, if a reference or evidence base is available, you are encouraged to provide it. You are required to provide the evidence base for all core interventions.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  18.  

    In Section G, what do you consider to be 'literature' and what do you consider to be 'evaluation studies'?

    Literature about your core intervention(s) may or may not include the results of evaluation studies. There are published evaluation studies that are not in peer-reviewed journal articles. A peer-reviewed journal article could count as both if it presents outcomes from evaluation studies related to your core intervention.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  19.  

    How do we find evidence from evaluation studies or literature for MFF programs?

    If you have implemented MFF programs previously, you may use local program results. Data from other, comparable (nutrition, physical activity promotion, etc.) programming can also add to your evidence.

    Last updated: March 12, 2019 Back to Top
  20.  

    [If we are programming to all grades at a site, can we offer Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities (HSHC) to just PreK & Kindergarten and a different intervention to grades 3-5, or do we have to use HSHC for all grades]?

    You are not limited to a single intervention for a site; however, your proposal should make the case for how the intervention(s) you select aligns with your needs assessment and organizational capacity, as well as present evidence that demonstrates the likelihood that the intervention will produce positive outcomes with your target audience(s).

    Last updated: March 20, 2019 Back to Top
  21.  

    Under the evidence-based programs approved, there is one called “Hip Hop to Health Jr. (HHH).” They do not have a parent piece to the program, only a curriculum for Head Start students. Are parent classes mandatory? If so, could I do HHH within the Head Starts and then do EWPH for the parent classes? Or, can I teach HHH lesson plans to parents (modify for parent level) based off the HHH curriculum.

    If referring to the SNAP-Ed Toolkit, while it is a great resource to search for evidence-based interventions, it’s important to recognize that the Toolkit is not an exhaustive list and not all of the interventions or materials listed are fully SNAP-Ed allowable, appropriate for use in Michigan, or aligned with your focus audience(s) or community(ies). Interventions should be selected based on the results of your needs assessment and the likelihood they will lead to positive outcomes for your target audience(s) and community. Please see Sections F and G in the Proposal Instructions for more details.

    As for providing direct nutrition education to both parents and children, there is no requirement to do so; however, your target audience(s) and programming should be determined by a thorough needs assessment of your community. Results from the needs assessment should serve as the rationale for why the intervention(s) was selected, how it will meet the needs of the target audience(s), and how it will achieve your program objectives.

    Finally, it is important that interventions are used as intended, as the evidence base was established with the full intervention. Modifying an intervention would mean that there is no evidence the it will result in positive outcomes with your target audience.

    Last updated: March 20, 2019 Back to Top
  22.  

    What are examples of PSE interventions or specific PSE interventions?

    The Proposal Backgrounder can provide some clarity on PSE change efforts starting on page 7, and examples of PSE interventions can be found throughout, such as on page 17. Another place you may reference is the SNAP-Ed Toolkit. The Toolkit, however, is not an exhaustive list and not all of the interventions or materials listed are fully SNAP-Ed allowable, or are appropriate for use in Michigan. Interventions should also be selected based on the results of your needs assessment and the likelihood they will lead to the outcomes described in your proposal.

    Last updated: March 28, 2019 Back to Top
  23.  

    Is the Food Navigator* program considered DE, PSE, and IC, or just DE and IC?

    The Food Navigator program is based on one-on-one interactions between the food navigator and market shoppers. These interactions are either captured as indirect channel (IC) reach or direct education (DE) reach. In order to be counted as DE, the interaction must be meaningful, last for 20 minutes or more, and be based on the scheduled food navigator activity programming for that day.

    Food navigators will track both IC and DE reach, but it should be noted that DE interactions are typically a small portion.

    The Food Navigator program does not have an inherent PSE component at this time, but the program itself deepens relationships which can support PSE work.

    Last updated: March 28, 2019 Back to Top
  24.  

    Can you please provide me where I can access the literature and evidence for Linking Lessons for Communities* intervention?

    Linking Lessons - Communities is currently in the final stages of its pilot, and MFF anticipates the results early next year. For proposal writing, if you have implemented Linking Lessons previously, using your local data is acceptable. Data from other, comparable community-based, nutrition education programs can provide additional supporting evidence.

    Last updated: March 28, 2019 Back to Top
  25.  

    Can literature and evidence from evaluation studies on Healthy Classrooms, Healthy Schools be used for Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities*?

    It is important to distinguish that the evidence base was established for PE-Nut, which includes Healthy Classrooms, Healthy Schools as well as Health Through Literacy, Fit Bits, EPEC, etc. However, as the enhancements and content have not substantively changed under the new Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities, MFF is confident that the evidence base for PE-Nut will still apply. MFF is also in the process of building the evidence base for Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities.

    Last updated: March 28, 2019 Back to Top
  26.  

    What are [possible] next steps for the Rec-Connect PSE intervention after the PAC assessment?

    The PSE component of Rec-Connect includes a physical activity community assessment, and the Promoting Active Communities (PAC) assessment is one example of this kind of assessment. These community assessments lead to action planning. The action plan can, and should, have short, medium, and long-term actions to lead to PSE changes. However, depending on community context and needs, the role of SNAP-Ed in the plan may vary and/or evolve over time. For example, with Rec-Connect, your work (time commitment) may ebb and flow for a specific community, and a next step may be to work in another community/location that has identified needs aligned with the expected outcomes of Rec-Connect.

    Regarding the PAC specifically, a variety of next steps are possible for community teams, ideally with community partners facilitating the process. For instance:

    • Once a community completes a PAC module (including a community assessment, site audit, and creation of an action plan) and makes PSE changes, the community can complete the same module again as a reassessment to document what has changed and plan for additional changes.
    • Once a community completes one PAC topic module (such as the Parks and Recreation Module), the community could then complete a different topic module (such as the Schools Module) to assess and work on PSE changes related to a different aspect of the physical activity in the community.
    • For organizations that work in multiple communities, once one community completes a PAC module, the organization could work with a different community to complete PAC modules and work towards PSE changes.

    Also, it is possible that a program takes its PSE change efforts into a new direction due to changing community needs and priorities. Therefore, it is important to keep in mind that each program and community will be different, and there will be many variables that can affect what comes after a Rec-Connect or PAC intervention.

    Last updated: March 29, 2019 Back to Top
  27.  

    We are considering using Youth Participatory Action Research. Is YPAR considered DE, PSE, or a combination of both? What should we [use to evaluate] YPAR?

    Youth Participatory Action Research (YPAR) may be classified as PSE, but it is important to note that YPAR is an approach to PSE change work, not a PSE intervention in and of itself. Generally, in YPAR, youth are empowered to examine and influence community problems. They identify and come to an agreement on an issue to address and that determines the PSE change intervention or strategy. As a result, the evaluation depends on the specific PSE change intervention selected and would not need to be adjusted by using a YPAR approach. There are additional evaluation methods, like Photovoice, that are often used in youth-engagement programs and could be incorporated. More information on YPAR can be found at yparhub.berkeley.edu/.

    Last updated: March 29, 2019 Back to Top
  28.  

    Do the evidence-based interventions that we select need to have been implemented or tested before in Michigan?

    There is no requirement that interventions need to have been tested or implemented before in Michigan. Any intervention that selected should be based on a thorough needs assessment of the local community, evidence that the intervention would likely result in positive outcomes with the target audience, and alignment with Michigan SNAP-Ed program parameters. Please also see Question 4 above in Interventions.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  29.  

    Would it be OK to use a cooking curriculum but do tastings instead of cooking?

    It is important that interventions are used as intended since that is on which the evidence base for the intervention was established. If you modify core components of an evidence-based intervention, then the intervention is no longer supported by the evidence.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  30.  

    We found 2 evidence-based interventions that each have components of what we are looking for in an intervention. Would it be possible to have a program that is a combination of the two?

    Combining certain components of multiple interventions creates a completely new intervention. Therefore, the evidence that was established for the individual interventions will no longer be applicable, and you will not end up using an evidence-based intervention, which is a requirement of SNAP-Ed. The tip sheet, A Closer Look at Evidence-Based Interventions, which can be found on the MNN website’s How to Apply page, may add clarity on selecting interventions.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  31.  

    Can we implement a Fresh Prescriptions (Fresh Rx) program and provide nutrition education to its clients?

    In general, a “Fresh Rx” program is one in which health providers “prescribe” fresh fruits and vegetables (such as in the form of a voucher) to low-income patients. Participants then “fill” their prescriptions (vouchers) at partnering sites, such as farmers markets. In addition to the fresh fruits/vegetables, participants may also receive nutrition education as part of the program.

    While SNAP-Ed cannot fund the Fresh Rx vouchers, there are ways that SNAP-Ed organizations can support a Fresh Rx program. For example, SNAP-Ed programs may partner with an existing Fresh Rx program in the community to provide nutrition and/or physical activity promotion to supplement the program. SNAP-Ed programs can also work to establish a Fresh Rx program in their community as part of their PSE change work.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  32.  

    We would like to include newsletters as a supplemental resource to our DE. Are there any requirements around the use of newsletters?

    When considering supplemental resources, it is important that they add value to your programming and are an effective means to reinforce the nutrition and physical activity promotion concepts presented in your core DE.

    Depending on your intervention, and if the newsletters are an existing resource or need to be developed, MFF pre-approval may be needed before they are used.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  33.  

    Is there a minimum or maximum number of sessions that should be provided in an intervention?

    To maintain program fidelity, you should implement an evidence-based intervention as it was intended, which includes following the number of sessions. However, small changes may be made to accommodate local conditions if they don’t change the core components of the intervention. An example of this could be splitting a lesson up in to two sessions.

    Note that if the needs of your target audience don’t align with how a particular intervention is designed, and any needed changes would impact the core components, the intervention may not be the best fit for your audience.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  34.  

    Can we purchase a Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities (HSHC) subscription for multiple NEs to use or would everyone need their own?

    Each person that needs access to the HSHC materials would need their own subscription.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  35.  

    Would the classroom teachers we work with also need a subscription? Or, can teachers use Healthy Classrooms, Healthy Schools materials that they have while the Nutrition Educators use the new Healthy Schools, Healthy Communities?

    There are certain cases where having a HSHC subscription for the classroom teacher may make sense. For example:

    • If your SNAP-Ed program uses a peer role modeling approach to nutrition education whereby a Nutrition Educator (NE) models how to implement HSHC lessons for a teacher in one classroom, and the teacher is expected to replicate the lesson with their other classes/students; or
    • If your SNAP-Ed program provides HSHC materials for teachers so that they can do more activities and/or lessons with their class(es), and they participate in SNAP-Ed evaluation (e.g., completing teacher logs).

    In these situations, building in HSHC subscriptions for teachers into your SNAP-Ed budget may be appropriate. It would be recommended that NEs and classroom teachers use the same version of the curriculum in order to maintain consistency in content and evaluation.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  36.  

    I can’t find the Linking Lesson (LL) kits on the MFF website. Is this still a DE option? If so, how much are the LL poster sets?

    Linking Lessons are short, interactive lessons based around an attractive poster that conveys a healthy eating or physical activity message. Starting in FY20, Linking Lessons will be available for multiple settings and audiences:

    • Linking Lessons – Schools (original)
    • Linking Lessons – Communities
    • Linking Lessons – People with Cognitive Disabilities

     

    Below are descriptions of each type of Linking Lessons and estimates of cost of materials.

    Linking Lessons – Schools*

    • Setting/Delivery Site: Schools
    • Age Group: Middle- and high-school students
    • Description: Topics include U.S. Food Guide, healthy snacking, fruits and vegetables, and portion control. A food tasting accompanies each lesson, as well as a Healthy Homework that relates to the lesson theme.
    • Supplies and Materials: There are a total of ten (10) posters and Lesson Guides which give step-by-step instructions for delivering each lesson.
    • Cost: To estimate budgets, use $300 per poster set*. Other materials needed include food tasting supplies and recipe ingredients.

     

    Linking Lessons – Communities*

    • Setting/Delivery Site: Settings in the community where people can attend a series of 20-minute lessons
    • Age Group: Teens and adults
    • Description: The first lesson (of each topic) covers talking points and offers a plain/raw version of the featured food and a physical activity demonstration. The second lesson (of each topic) reviews concepts and includes a recipe tasting. Topics include MyPlate, fruits and vegetables, healthy drinks and snacks, and portion size. A food tasting based on a Michigan Harvest of the Month recipe is part of each lesson. The lesson ends with a challenge for participants to complete before the next lesson a Healthy Homework related to the lesson theme.
    • Supplies and Materials: There are five (5) posters and Lesson Guides (to be covered over 10 sessions) which give step-by-step instructions for delivering each lesson.
    • Cost: To estimate budgets, use $300 per poster set*. Other materials needed include food tasting supplies and recipe ingredients.

     

    Linking Lessons – People with Cognitive Disabilities*

    • Setting/Delivery Site: Settings where people with cognitive disabilities learn, work, or live (such as transition centers, group homes, adult foster care, and high school special education settings)
    • Age Group: Ages 16 and over
    • Description: Basic but important information is offered to help participants eat more fruits and vegetables, choose healthy drinks and snacks, moderate portion size, and be more physically active. A food tasting based on a Michigan Harvest of the Month recipe is part of each lesson. The lesson ends with a challenge to participants to complete before the following lesson a Healthy Homework related to the lesson theme.
    • Supplies and Materials: There are five (5) posters and Lesson Guides (to be covered over 10 sessions) which give step-by-step instructions for delivering each lesson.
    • Cost: To estimate budgets, use $300 per poster set*. Other materials needed include food tasting supplies and recipe ingredients.

    *Poster sets consist of the applicable Linking Lessons posters and Lesson Guides only. No carrying bag(s) will be included.

    Last updated: April 15, 2019 Back to Top
  37.  

    Have the Linking Lessons been translated to Arabic?

    Currently, Linking Lessons is only available in English. Specific translation needs can be addressed on a case-by-case basis with MFF and/or your designated MFF Project Manager.

    Last updated: April 04, 2019 Back to Top
  38.  

    As a 2018 RFA award recipient, we tested Linking Lessons in new settings, including farmers' markets where interventions are typically shorter than 20 minutes each. Will this format be considered acceptable for single sessions in this RFP?

    From the learnings and feedback received from the pilot with FY18 RFA organizations, Linking Lessons in new settings/with new audiences (e.g., communities and people with cognitive disabilities) has been updated and each lesson in Linking Lessons will be at least 20 minutes.

    Also, please note that the Linking Lessons intervention is designed to be implemented as a series of lessons. Individual lessons are not meant to be used as one-off interactions.

    For more information on the new Linking Lessons, see Question 36 in Interventions.

    Last updated: April 15, 2019 Back to Top

*MFF has new or updated interventions for working with seniors, people with cognitive disabilities, farmers markets, school gardens, community-based settings, among others.

Last Updated

10:30 am on April 15, 2019